(via Uncommon Health)
Oxycodone has been around since 1916. Purdue Pharma just added a time release element to it, called their “new” drug Oxycontin, slapped a patent on it, then spent millions to give over 5,000 doctors all-expense paid trips to conferences esp
ousing the magical pain relief benefits of their “new” drug. They claimed there was less than a 1% chance of addiction to their new drug. We can liken them to the hosts of the old opium dens who helped their patrons become addicted, then sapped them for everything—in some cases, even their lives. Purdue’s patent expires shortly. What will happen then?

(via Uncommon Health)

Oxycodone has been around since 1916. Purdue Pharma just added a time release element to it, called their “new” drug Oxycontin, slapped a patent on it, then spent millions to give over 5,000 doctors all-expense paid trips to conferences esp

ousing the magical pain relief benefits of their “new” drug. They claimed there was less than a 1% chance of addiction to their new drug. We can liken them to the hosts of the old opium dens who helped their patrons become addicted, then sapped them for everything—in some cases, even their lives. Purdue’s patent expires shortly. What will happen then?